The hat that was not to be

A Mountain T.O.P. friend of mine is friends with a fellow who has started a company making high-tech ball caps. There are two kinds. One runs on wafer-style batteries and has a little place on the brim where you can plug in an optional LED light. The other kind, a little more elaborate, has a built-in battery that you can charge up through a USB port and then, in turn, use to provide backup or emergency power to your smartphone or other mobile device.

The Mountain T.O.P. friend knew that I reviewed tech products for the newspaper and contacted me recently to get my name and address so that his friend could send me the hats to try out and review.

They arrived earlier in the week – and while I would normally have wanted to put them through their paces and write a proper review, I was in dire need of a topic for my tech column so I wrote something hasty basically explaining how they worked. It wasn’t a review in the traditional sense of the word, just a story.

I was happy to think about taking the backup-battery hat to Mountain T.O.P., where it would be useful for keeping my phone charged (although I also have another, relatively new, backup battery for that purpose).

Let me explain to you something about how the backup-battery hat works. There are two different pieces that store in the hat band which you use for charging up the hat. One is a male-to-male USB cable, about six inches long. The other is a little plastic dongle with flashing blue lights. It has a female USB connection on one end, and a male micro-USB connection on the other.

When I first hooked up the hat, one end of the USB cable felt a little strange. The blue lights on the dongle flashed for a long time, to the point where I finally e-mailed the hatmaker to ask how long the hat was supposed to take to charge. He gave me some suggestions, but when I went to hook the hat back up the silver piece pulled out of one end of the USB cable. That’s why it had felt loose; it was loose. I e-mailed him back and he promised to send me a replacement 6-inch cable by U.S. mail.

This morning, at the newspaper, one of my co-workers handed me an empty envelope (other than a business card) with a little hole on one end. I can only assume that some mail-handling machine had grabbed hold of the end of the envelope and squeezed out that little cable like toothpaste from a tube. In any case, there was no cable. Again, I e-mailed the hatmaker. I told him I was going to try to find a USB-to-USB cable on my own.

I e-mailed my local computer guru, a man who I know has a lot of spare parts and cables. Sure enough, he found me a long USB-to-USB cable. It wasn’t small enough to fit in a hatband, of course, but it could easily be used for charging up the hat so that I could take it to Mountain T.O.P. this weekend. I rushed over to his place and grabbed the cable. He’s going to have one of his students try to solder the original cable and see if it can be fixed.

Well, when I got home just now I tried hooking the hat back up to finish charging it. The blue lights didn’t come on at all. I didn’t know why, so I unhooked everything.

That, so help me, is when the micro-USB end of the charging dongle popped off.

I swear up and down to you I have not treated any of this equipment (some of which is suggested for use by hunters and campers) roughly or subjected it to anything out of the ordinary. And, of course, the cable being lost in the mail was out of my hands entirely. I’m not about to try to get back in touch with the hatmaker, though, because I’m sure he would assume all of this is my fault, just as I’m assuming its all his suppliers’ fault.

I still have the battery-operated hat, and I can take that one to Mountain T.O.P. and use it to read songsheets and my Bible during evening worship outdoors. But it won’t help keep my smartphone charged. (And the battery-operated hat is camouflage, not really my style.)

Oh, well.

Analog

When I was a teenager, I read a lot of science fiction, went to a couple of conventions, and so on. I got away from the written science fiction at one point while I was in college, and I don’t really know why. I’ve certainly enjoyed various science fiction movies and tv shows since that time.

Anyway, I was a subscriber during that time to Analog, the granddaddy of all science fiction magazines. Analog goes all the way back to 1930, under the original title of Astounding Science Fiction, and many of the genre’s leading names were first published in its pages. Each issue included an article on some cutting-edge or speculative scientific topic (hence the subtitle “Science Fiction & Science Fact”).

I even tried sending them a story when I was a teenager, my first attempt at serious fiction. (It never went anywhere.) I was also a subscriber to another, similar magazine, Isaac Asimov’s – in fact, it was during the period when I was subscribing to both of them that the company which already owned Isaac Asimov’s bought Analog as well.

I happened to think about Analog a couple months back. I went online found that it’s still being published, as is Isaac Asimov’s. You can get them in print, or you can get them on your favorite e-reader, either in subscription or single-copy form. I decided I was going to buy a single copy of Analog at some point, on Kindle, just to see what it was like, but I never followed up.

My brother Michael was in from North Carolina over the weekend to pick up my nephew from Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala. (He went to a robotics-themed camp and had a fantastic time.) When I talked to Mike on the phone Thursday night, he said he had something to give me. When I got to Dad’s house after work on Friday, I found out what it was. Mike and Kelly had been in a used bookstore in North Carolina and had found a treasure trove of back issues of Analog for just pennies an issue. Mike bought a huge box, kept some for himself, and gave several dozen to me. They range from the late 1960s up to about 1990. (Mike was under the impression the magazine had gone out of business.) Here are just a few of them:

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Some were even from the period during which I was a subscriber – in fact, one of them includes part of Spider and Jeanne Robinson’s “Stardance.” The original short story “Stardance” ran in Analog just before I started reading it, but it was followed a year or so later by a sequel, “Stardance II,” a novella which was serialized over several issues. Then, the short story and the novella were combined and published as a book. My first copy of that book got thrown out at some point, but I went back and re-purchased it later, and it’s still one of my favorites. One of the magazines in the assortment Mike gave me contains the first installment of the novella, and even though I have it in its final book form it’s still a neat souvenir for sentimental reasons.

I just got through reading “The Hornless Ones,” by Paul Ash, a short story from the August 1990 issue you can see at far left in the photo. It made me feel like I was 16 again, looking for the latest issue to show up in my mailbox.

road trip

OK. I had a really crappy first part of the week. There was a special event that I wanted to attend – and thought I deserved to be able to attend – and I couldn’t go because I couldn’t afford it. And I was primarily mad at myself, but also projected some of that anger onto a couple of innocent people who I (narcissistically) thought should have been more concerned than they were about my absence, perhaps to the point of calling me about it and getting me to admit the back story.

But if the first part of the week was a low point, this weekend more than made up for it, and exorcised the demons that had been plaguing me.

Here’s the back story:

Many years back, when my brother Michael was single and living in the Dallas area, he starred in a production of “Harvey” which, by sheer coincidence, opened on his birthday. Mom, Dad, my sister and I drove down secretly, watched the play from the back row, and then surprised him afterward. It’s been a beloved family story ever since.

Mike is now married, has two kids, and lives in Fayetteville, N.C. He’s gotten back into theater lately; he was supposed to be the lead in a big production last summer but broke his foot. This summer, he played Leonato in “Much Ado About Nothing” and also had a part in a comedy called “A Company Of Wayward Saints.” Dad wanted to go and surprise Michael again the way we surprised him in Texas. So we’d been making plans for the trip for some time, without telling anyone in North Carolina.

Then, a week or two ago, Mike called my father. My gifted nephew had gotten a chance to go to Space Camp, in Huntsville, Ala., at the last minute and at a deep discount. Mike and Kelly had decided that Kelly would drive the boy down (since Mike would be busy with the play) and then Mike would drive down a week later, after the play had closed, to pick him up. Mike asked Dad if it would be all right for Kelly and the boy to spend the night with him on Saturday, June 14.

That’s right; of all the days in the year they might call and ask to stay at Dad’s house, they picked the night when Dad, and the rest of us, planned to be in Fayetteville, N.C.

Dad covered quickly, telling Michael that he and Ms. Rachel had already made plans to go out of town that weekend (true!), but that Kelly and the boy were more than welcome to use his house while he was gone.

A few days later, we surreptitiously got in touch with Kelly and filled her in on what was really going on.

Friday, Dad, Ms. Rachel, Elecia and I got an early start and made it to Fayetteville by about 5:30. We had originally hoped to catch Michael before he left for his Friday night performance, but we missed him. When we pulled up to the house in Fayetteville, no one was home. Kelly and the kids were out shopping, and Mike was already at the theater. We returned a little later to see Kelly and the kids, while Mike was taking the stage.

Later that night, after Mike’s Friday night performance, Kelly got him to call my father and Dad revealed that we were, in fact, in Fayetteville. Mike was genuinely surprised and now says he’ll never trust any of us again.

The next morning, Kelly and the boy made a very early start for Tennessee. We spent a pleasant day seeing the sights of Fayetteville with Michael and the girl. In the afternoon, we had a little down time, and I got to relax in the Days Inn pool, which I had pretty much to myself. Then, that night, with the girl in the hands of a babysitter, we went to the play.

I found it wonderful. “A Comedy of Wayward Saints,” by George Herman, is a terrific play, and the Gilbert Theater cast, including my brother, was terrific. It starts out as a wacky comedy about a commedia dell’arte troupe trying desperately to impress a nobleman who can give them the money to get home. But in the second act, the wacky comedy gives way to a warmer but still light-hearted exploration of the nature of humanity. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

This morning, we started the nine-hour drive home, arriving about 4 p.m. Shelbyville time. Kelly, meanwhile, dropped the boy off in Huntsville at noon today and then headed to Fayetteville from there – no telling if we crossed paths at some point.

It was a great trip, a great play, and a great chance to spent some time with the family over Father’s Day weekend.

hop to it

I admit it – I was the token heterosexual viewer of the Tony Awards on Sunday night, although I was busy with other things and wasn’t watching most of it all that closely. I did like the bit with Carole King and the woman who’s currently playing her on Broadway. But I was about five minutes late switching over to the show – which killed me, because I wanted to see how this “Duck Dynasty” cast member Hugh Jackman responded to Neil Patrick Harris’ hoop-jumping, everything-but-the-kitchen-sink opening number last year.

I went back and caught the opening later, online. Here it is.

This performance was a tribute to something. I knew what it was, even before Hugh hopped past that video screen on which it was playing. There was a scene from a classic MGM musical in which Bobby Van did a similar hopping number:

In this case, I had never seen the actual movie and could not have told you the name: “Small Town Girl.” I had seen this number as part of “That’s Entertainment,” a feature-length compilation and tribute to MGM’s Freed Unit musicals that ran in theaters, and then on TV, in the 1970s. (The YouTube clip above is taken from “That’s Entertainment,” which is why you hear a second or two of Gene Kelly’s voice introducing the routine.)

I remember Bobby Van and his wife, Elaine Joyce, mostly from game shows. (I was obsessed with game shows as a child, growing up as I did in the heyday of the daytime network game show.) They were each panelists on “Match Game” at one point or another, and they appeared as a couple on “Tattletales,” which was Goodson-Todman’s celebrity version of “The Newlywed Game.” Bobby Van even hosted a few short-lived game shows himself. It wasn’t until I saw “That’s Entertainment” that I realized his celebrity came from any place other than game shows.

Right about the time I tuned over last night, before I had seen the actual number, I laughed out loud at Tori Taff’s response to it on Facebook:

  • You know you’re of a certain age when u watch Hugh Jackman BOUNCE into#Tonys2014 & all u can think is “Yeah, knee replacements for sure.”

It seems like a strange choice to have the opening number of the Tonys be a tribute to a scene from a movie, but the song to which Bobby Van was hopping was called “Take Me To Broadway,” so maybe it wasn’t such a strange choice after all.

brown sugar cinnamon ice cream

I don’t normally keep milk around the house, but I bought a quart the other day for a couple of things I was cooking. I still had most of the quart left over, and I was afraid it was going to go bad if I didn’t do something with it.

So I threw together some ice cream tonight in my little Donvier countertop ice cream maker (the one I bought for $1 at the T-G yard sale). I had no cream, but I did have one last egg — something else I needed to use up. I used up some brown sugar, and added a little cinnamon and vanilla. I scalded the milk-and-egg mixture around 6 tonight and then put it into the Donvier a little before 10.

It’s now in the freezer hardening. The Donvier only brings things to soft-serve consistency, so you have to transfer them to a container and put them in the freezer to harden the rest of the way if you want scoopable ice cream. I won’t get to have a serving until tomorrow night. But what I licked off the dasher and the spatula was quite good, for something thrown together from leftovers.

crossbones

It’s a bad sign that I hadn’t even heard of “Crossbones” until after the first episode had aired, and that NBC is showing it on Friday nights during the summer.

But I have to say, I am thoroughly enjoying it. Maybe since I know going in that it’s not long for this world, I won’t be too disappointed when the inevitable happens.

“Crossbones” is a pirate drama with John Malkovich as Edward “Blackbeard” Teatch. Malkovich is the star, but Richard Coyle as resourceful, well-educated British agent Tom Lowe is the central character. Lowe has orders to kill Blackbeard, but finds himself Blackbeard’s prisoner, in effect, on a secret Caribbean island.

The show is more entertainment than history – an anachronistic steampunk submarine has been hinted at – but there is one interesting historical connection. Earlier today, before watching the first episode, I noticed that the Amazon Kindle deal of the day was “Longitude” by Dava Sobel. This is a non-fiction book about the creation of the first accurate clock that could be taken to sea, enabling mariners for the first time to be able to calculate their longitude, and thus their exact position. The book sounded interesting.

Then, when I watched the first episode, that very clock turned out to be a critical plot point on the show – Blackbeard wants it, and Lowe must try to keep it out of his hands. (I ended up going back and buying the Kindle book out of curiosity, while it was still on sale for $1.99.0)

Malkovich and Coyle are both fantastic, as are several of the other players. (I’m sometimes annoyed by the Coyle character’s dim-bulb Jimmy Olsen sidekick, but that’s a quibble.)

I can’t understand why NBC isn’t giving this more of a chance; I think it’s wonderful escapist entertainment.

Here, if you’re interested, are the first two episodes:

a good weekend

I didn’t post about Relay yesterday because I was focusing on the video.  (I admit it. I was kind of proud of how the video turned out.)

Anyway, I think we were all pleased with how it turned out. We have not yet met our (ambitious) 2014 goal, but the Relay year runs until Aug. 31 and some of our teams still have fund-raisers planned. We had a great turnout Friday night, and everything went smoothly. There were clouds, it was breezy during our setup hours on Friday afternoon, and we worried a little about rain, but the worst we got was a couple of light sprinkles – not even enough to make you put up an umbrella. (Unfortunately, the weather forecast was enough to prevent the rock-climbing wall from arriving in the first place.

My first Relay was in 2011, and since I wasn’t a part of the county organizing committee I didn’t get there until an hour or two before opening ceremonies. That was a 12-hour Relay. My second, in 2012, was an 18-hour Relay, and I had to arrive earlier to help with setup. In both cases, I got sleepy in the wee hours of the morning but then caught a second wind and finished well. Last year, I never got that second wind, and I was groggy alll through the morning.

This year, possibly due to the first 5-Hour Energy I’ve ever consumed, but also possibly due to weight loss and more regular exercise, I did much, much better. We went back to a 12-hour format this year, so I didn’t have to stay as long as I did last year. But even taking the different schedule into account, I felt noticeably better and got to enjoy the overnight fun much more this year than last year.

Speaking of fitness, here’s the bad news. Remember that Fitbit that I thought I lost at last year’s Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration but which turned up in my car seven months later? Well, I lost it again. And I’m certain it’s not in the car; I remember having it on at Relay, thinking about how many steps I was going to register when I got home and synched it with the computer. Now, I’ll never know.

lisa

I just watched a sensational movie I’d never seen or even heard of before: “Lisa,” with Dolores Hart and Stephen Boyd. Dolores Hart – who is now a Benedictine nun – is co-hosting an evening of movies on Turner Classic Movies, and this apparently seldom-seen gem was one she requested they show.

Dolores Hart, before entering the convent, was best known for appearing in a couple of movies with Elvis (“Loving You” and “King Creole”) as well as “Where The Boys Are.” While they aren’t showing either of the Elvis movies tonight, Robert Osborne had to ask her about Elvis, and she remarked on what a gentleman he was to her, calling her “Miss Dolores” – the same thing she would later be called as a postulant!

Stephen Boyd is best known, to me, anyhow, as the bad guy in “Ben-Hur,” but he’s the good guy in “Lisa.”  He plays a Dutch policeman in 1946, guilt-ridden because he could not save his wife from the Nazis, who encounters an emotionally-scarred survivor of the concentration camps and Nazi expermentation. Lisa (Hart) wants to travel to Palestine (the movie is set two years before the state of Israel was created) and become a nurse. Seeking redemption, Boyd vows that he will help her get there. Her experiences have left her with trust issues, and she’s not sure how to take his offer.

A highlight of the film early on is an appearance by one of my favorites, Leo McKern (of “Rumpole of the Bailey” and “The Prisoner”) as a curmudgeonly barge captain who helps the pair get out of Amsterdam.

A terrific movie, with great performances by both of the stars.