-30-

One of the last times I had any contact with Chris Shofner – I thought it was on Facebook messenger, but I can’t find it there – he asked when we were going to have lunch again. I don’t know why we didn’t set something up then and there; it was probably my fault.

We’d had lunch just a few months before. I happened to have the day off from work, but when I went out to my car to go and meet Chris, it wouldn’t turn over. I called Chris, and he good-naturedly came over, gave me a jump start, and followed me to AutoZone, where I bought a new battery I hadn’t planned on buying. Chris ended up buying my lunch.

In 1985, when I returned to Bedford County, tail between my legs, after my first career plan hadn’t quite worked out, I decided to go and put in an application at the hometown newspaper. I’d taken some newspaper classes as part of my mass communications major, and I’d spent a lot of time at the campus paper my senior year – mostly because I had a crush on a woman who worked there. But I hadn’t taken as many newspaper courses as I might have if I’d known I was going to spend 30 years-and-counting in the business.

Anyway, when I got to the T-G, the first person I talked to was Chris. He had not officially been named editor yet – that would come a few weeks later – but had been doing the job. He told me how much he liked my resume and how much he needed a reporter. He then took me in to see Mr. Franklin Yates, the publisher who’d merged the Times and the Gazette in 1948. Mr. Yates, who had a gruff exterior but a big heart, originally told me he ha nothing open – which I knew, from my conversation with Chris, was not the case. I figured I’d offended him somehow and gave up on working at the Times-Gazette. But it was just Mr. Yates being Mr. Yates.

After I’d left, Mr. Yates called Marvin Whitaker – who’d been my high school principal and who was, at that time, layleader of one of the churches at which my father was preaching. I’m sure Mr. Whitaker told Mr. Yates that I’d hung the moon and several of the stars. In any case, Mr. Yates called me in a day or two later and offered me the job.

I had a great relationship with Chris during the time he was my editor. He was kind, considerate, empathetic. We always felt like friends, not just co-workers, and he always made me feel like he appreciated what I did.

I loved that Chris was a musician on the side. When I first met him, he was in a band called Jet Set. They often introduced themselves as “Maxell recording artists Jet Set,” Maxell not being a record label but rather a brand of blank recording tape. Later, he and his friend Scott Pallot would put a lot of love and care into a children’s album.

Chris went on to work in marketing for a company in Memphis, but then – after a health scare – came back here to Middle Tennessee, where he was the press spokesman for the City of Murfreesboro for a number of years. More recent health concerns forced him to give that up, too.

Now that he’s gone, of course, I wish not only that I’d had lunch with him the last time we talked, but a lot more times. He was right here in town, and I didn’t take the time.

Chris was 61. He died less than a week after his mother, Betty, and I can’t imagine what that must be like for the family.

I hate that I’m going to miss visitation and the funeral. I know Chris will understand that I’ll be in ministry up on the Cumberland Plateau; I leave tomorrow morning for a week at Mountain T.O.P. But I’m sorry I won’t get to speak to his wife, attorney Ginger Shofner, or to his daughter Willa Kate. Please join me in keeping them in your prayers.

(NOTE: In the old days when news stories were typed on paper, ‘’-30-“ was typographer’s code for the end of a story.)

The Spoils Before Dying

If you missed “Eric Jonrosh’s ‘The Spoils of Babylon'” last summer, I feel sorry for you. But the good news is, “The Spoils Before Dying” starts next month on IFC.

“The Spoils of Babylon” was, supposedly, the magnum opus of novelist-turned-producer Eric Jonrosh, filmed at the height of the miniseries craze in the late 70s or early 80s (think “Rich Man, Poor Man,” or “The Thorn Birds,” or “The Winds of War”). Jonrosh adapted his biggest novel for the screen. But the network wouldn’t air it, and so it sat in a vault for years until last summer, when it was broadcast for the very first time, with each episode personally introduced by the bloated, bearded Jonrosh, along with his personal remembrances of the cast and the challenges faced during production.

Only that’s not it at all. There is no “Eric Jonrosh”; the fellow who introduced the miniseries last year was actually Will Ferrell wearing a fat suit and a fake beard and doing his best impression of latter-day, past-his-prime Orson Welles. “The Spoils of Babylon” actually starred Tobey Maguire, Kristin Wiig, Tim Robbins and Haley Joel Osment, although they were given fake actor names in the opening credits of the first episode, to tie in with the pretense that this whole thing was shot in the 1970s. It was a hilarious parody of the potboiler miniseries genre, with brilliant performances by the four leads and various guest stars including Val Kilmer, David Spade, Jessica Alba, Michael Sheen and Molly Shannon.

Well, “The Spoils Before Dying” will be the same thing — not a sequel to “Babylon” but supposedly a “fully restored” adaptation of a different (and just as non-existent) Eric Jonrosh novel, this one with more of a film noir feel:

I cannot wait.

Break out the taboo cards

When I first signed up for Mountain T.O.P. Adults In Ministry (AIM) in 1993, it was because I thought it would be fun teaching creative writing to teenagers as part of the “Summer Plus” program. I had no teaching experience; my only experience was as a writer.

I didn’t actually get to teach the class that first year, but I’ve taught it many times since. Some have been more successful than others. Creative writing is the type of workshop where the teens have to want to be there. If they don’t – maybe they got their first choice of workshop in the morning but were arbitrarily assigned to creative writing in the afternoon – it seems an awful lot like school. I try hard not to make it seem like school, but I don’t have all of the tools in my toolkit that a professional educator would have.

Anyway, the past couple of years, for reasons I won’t go into, I haven’t been able to make plans in advance to go to AIM. In both 2013 and 2014, I got the chance to go at the last minute – which was great, but what it meant was that the lineup of Summer Plus workshops was already in place and they didn’t need to add another one. So I participated in Summer Plus solely as an assistant in someone else’s workshops. Last year, for example, I helped out in a cooking workshop taught by Jean Nulle and in a photography workshop taught by Bobby and Robert Matthews. That was fun – I enjoy helping in a workshop, especially in crafty sorts of workshops where it works out for the helpers to jump in and do the project alongside the teens.

But I still missed teaching my own workshop. And so, this year, when I was able to get my AIM application in well in advance, I looked forward to creative writing. I waited patiently to hear something. In the past, some of the preliminary arrangements for Summer Plus would sometimes be made by the year-round staff, and so you’d get a call a month or two before camp confirming what you wanted to teach and so on. But now, all of that is handled by the summer staff – who’ve only been on duty a few weeks and who’ve been busy this past week running the first AIM event of the summer. So I’ve been on pins and needles waiting to hear from somebody and confirm that I would, in fact, be teaching creative writing.

I got my courtesy call today, and everything is “go” for me to teach creative writing. I will only have one session (which is my preference, although I’d have done two sessions if they’d needed me to). The other half of the day I will be helping out with someone else’s workshop.

I generally start out by having the students (along with any helpers) pair up and interview each other and write a simple paragraph which they can use to introduce each other to the group. Then we talk about the importance of good description. At this point, I generally break out the party game “Taboo.” In this game, a player must describe a word or concept to his or her teammates – but can’t use the five most-obvious clues, which are taboo. For example, you might have to describe “Superman” without using “hero,” “Clark Kent,” “Lois Lane,” “fly” or “Krypton.” A member of the opposing team stands over your shoulder with a buzzer, ready to penalize you if you say one of the “taboo” words. There’s an egg timer, and you try to get your team to guess as many cards as possible before time runs out and the other team takes a turn.

We use the game to make a point about colorful description, but it’s also just fun to play. Later in the week, I’ll use it at the end of the session if we have time to kill or the natives are getting restless.

I’m on my second Taboo game, and I really need a new one – the buzzer is made of parts from the first game and the second game put together, and some of the cards have out-of-date cultural references that I suspect have been changed in the latest edition.

How far we go with storytelling depends on who’s in the class and what level they’re at. Some years, we’ve worked on a short and simple group story, short enough to be read aloud during our presentation for parents and family members at the end of the week.

One year, Diana Simmons Woodlock, the daughter of Mountain T.O.P. executive director Ed Simmons, was my helper in the class – a bit intimidating, since Diana really is a teacher. She told me at the end of the week that she’d been skeptical about the group story idea but was amazed at how far we’d gotten with it. That made me feel good.

I talk to the teens about the importance of journaling – as always with Summer Plus, we’ll have teens from a variety of home situations, good and bad, and some of them would no doubt benefit from an outlet. (One year, a girl actually told me that her counselor had encouraged her to journal.) I give them blank journals at the end of the week as a gift. Most of the journals I have were donated to me some years back, but in 2013 or 2014 – during a brief window when I thought I might still be teaching the class – I realized that most of the remaining journals were very girly in appearance. As it happens, most of my students over the years have been girls, but there have been boys, too, and so I rushed out that year and bought two or three gender-neutral looking journals just to be on the safe side.

I can’t wait to see how things go this year.

Checking in

Well, I’ve been sloppy about blog posts the past week or two, because I’ve been putting everything on Facebook and I was so wrapped up in Relay.

I’ve about recovered, although I’ll get another taste tomorrow, when I go to visit Marshall County’s Relay For Life and take a few photos of it for the Tribune. I went to Tullahoma’s Relay in 2014, but this will just be the second time I’ve been to a Relay event other than Bedford County’s. Trina Rios, the chair of Marshall County’s event, came to ours last weekend, and I was able to introduce her to Jennifer Smith, one of our two co-chairs. I’m looking forward to seeing how Marshall County does Relay.

Marshall County’s event is not overnight — it runs from noon until midnight on Saturday. The American Cancer Society used to require that Relay events take place overnight. It was part of the symbolism of the event — it symbolized a cancer patient passing through the dark night of illness and emerging on the other side, either in remission or, barring that, at least an end to pain. There are enough prime-time or daylight hours for the public — since we want the public to come and patronize the various concessions run by our teams. But then the wee hours of the morning are just for the walkers, and the people on the track at 3 a.m. can take a special kind of pride in their participation. That’s the way it works in Bedford County.

ACS, however, dropped the overnight requirement. Part of the event must still take place after dark — so that you can have a luminaria ceremony — but you don’t have to go overnight. Some communities are moving to a schedule that puts their entire event during the day and/or evening, so that they can maximize public attendance and the concession/festival aspects of Relay.

I understand this, and support the communities making that choice, but I also have a soft spot in my heart for the symbolism of that overnight walk. I think of the late Dr. Gordy Klatt, who started Relay For Life in Tacoma, Washington, by running for 24 hours as an individual fund-raiser. I imagine him running at 3 a.m., and still being on the track as the eastern sky started to lighten up a bit. I think of him running as the sun rises, and I smile.

During Relay, I posted a closeup of my Martha Deason Award plaque to Facebook, as well as the funny video where I drop my phone as my name is called. The closeup of the plaque got a lot of hits and likes, so I felt it would be overkill to add the photo that my co-worker Adria took of me using my T-G camera a few minutes later. But I liked that photo, which went into the T-G today, and so I’ll share it here.

DSC_0364

I still don’t know why they presented the award at night — in the past, it’s been part of the general awards given out at the end of Relay. I was walking back from somewhere, and Jennifer and Sharon stepped out of the gazebo to make an announcement. They mentioned the Martha Deason Award, which is our local Relay’s traditional volunteer-of-the-year plaque. I’d been making video all night, of course, and figured I’d capture the Deason award presentation as part of that. My smartphone was on a small, portable charger — the basic size and shape of a sleeve of Hall’s cough drops — with a cable connecting the two. Sharon was talking about the award, and when she got to my name, I was surprised enough that I let go of the charger. It dropped to the end of its cable and then jerked the phone out of my hand. I didn’t technically drop the phone all the way, just fumbled with it.

WP_20150605_110.mp4

I thought I'd get some video of them presenting the award… Little did I know.

Posted by John I. Carney on Friday, June 5, 2015

It was a neat honor. I’m proud of it. There are a lot of others who probably do more, but I’m an easy target because people know who I am.

people say they monkey around

My sister got me a DVD of Head (1968) for my birthday. I’d seen bits and pieces of it once, but I’d never watched the whole thing until tonight.

“Head,” of course, stars The Monkees — Davy Jones, Peter Tork, Mickey Dolenz and Michael Nesmith. It came out right after the cancellation of their TV series. It was directed by Bob Rafaelson and co-written by Rafaelson and Jack Nicholson – yes, that Jack Nicholson – right before the two of them went on to make “Easy Rider.” (Rafaelson, in fact, had been an executive producer of the Monkees’ TV show, and directed some of its episodes.)

The Monkees were, of course, not the type of organic band that comes together in high school or college. They were cast, by TV and music executives, as characters on a TV show, to be TV’s answer to the Beatles. But the Monkees weren’t satisfied with just being TV characters. They were discouraged at first that they had no control over their music, but they pushed for and eventually got that kind of control. You can’t blame the Monkees for having been cast; they at least had musical talent, and the ambition of being something more than an assembly line product. Even John Lennon defended them in an interview:

“They’ve got their own scene, and I won’t send them down for it. You try a weekly television show and see if you can manage one half as good!”

The TV show “The Monkees” is family-friendly – so much so that reruns of it ran several times on Saturday morning TV back when the networks put children’s programming on Saturday mornings. (Kids, ask your parents.) The TV show owes a lot to the Beatles’ movie “A Hard Day’s Night,” with a little bit of the rebellion toned down and a little bit of slapstick thrown in. The musical numbers from both “A Hard Day’s Night” and “The Monkees” set a template that would be followed by music videos a dozen years later, and Michael Nesmith, working as a director in the period around 1980, is considered one of the innovators of the music video format. It was a proof-of-concept show he produced for Time-Warner Cable which led to the creation of MTV.

“Head,” which came out about the time that the Monkees’ TV show had been cancelled, and at a time when conventional wisdom cast doubt on the band’s future, is more psychedelic than “The Monkees.” There’s no real story – just a series of bits and pieces, jumping here and there, to and fro, with musical numbers mixed in.

It was a failure at the time, but I found it to be a lot of fun – and there’s some fun meta-commentary about the Monkees’ own struggles to break out of the box in which they’d been put. Toward the end of the movie, they’re literally trapped in a box. They’re also battling a Jolly Green Giant-sized version of actor Victor Mature, and at least one critic has pointed out that this is probably a not-so-subtle jab at RCA Victor, the Monkees’ record label. (RCA had also been their TV employer, since it was the parent company of NBC.)

If anything, “Head” reminds me less of a Beatles movie than it does of two other bits of psychedelia I’ve seen from that same time frame: Skidoo (1968) and Good Times (1967). “Skidoo” is Otto Preminger’s attempt to make a drug culture movie, and it has a bizarre cast including Jackie Gleason, Groucho Marx, Carol Channing, Frankie Avalon, Burgess Meredith and Cesar Romero. Skidoo attempts a plot, but just barely.

“Good Times,” not to be confused with the 1970s sitcom starring Jimmie Walker, John Amos and Esther Rolle, stars Sonny and Cher. It’s not very good as a movie but it’s a lot of fun if you think of it as a variety show – or maybe just a series of music videos. The plot, which is really just a framing device, is that Sonny has signed himself and Cher, playing fictionalized versions of themselves, to a movie contract with a powerful and vaguely-sinister studio executive (George Sanders). Cher is skeptical about the idea, but Sonny tries to convince her by brainstorming possible ideas for a movie, which turn into fantasy sequences built around musical numbers. There’s a western, a Tarzan movie, and so on.

“Skidoo” is one of those things you have to see once just for the novelty of it, but it’s not really a very good movie per se. “Good Times” isn’t a very good movie either, but I’ve watched it more than once just because the musical numbers are so great, and it doesn’t take itself too seriously.

“Head” seems like it’s in the same vein as “Skidoo” and “Good Times,” but it ends up being quite a bit better than either of them – maybe because it was trying, not just to pander to what producers imagined the youth demographic wanted, but to make a statement. The Monkees may or may not have hoped that it would be taken seriously as a work of art, but in any case it was a statement of defiance, an attempt to show that they were something more than sitcom characters.

for a few daleks more

A week from tonight, on Thursday the 28th, Turner Classic Movies will broadcast “Dr. Who and the Daleks.”

As you know, I’m a big fan of the TV show “Doctor Who.” I was first introduced to the classic version of the show in the early 1980s, when I was in college and Oklahoma Public Television ran Tom Baker or Peter Davison episodes every night.

I’m a big enough fan to know a couple of things:

  • “Doctor” is always spelled out in the title of the TV show
  • The primary character of the TV show “Doctor Who” is not called “Doctor Who.” That’s a rookie mistake. The character is “The Doctor”; the show is “Doctor Who.”

I have gone on at length in other blog posts explaining what “Doctor Who” is for those unfamiliar. I will, however, explain that the original version of the show (which ran from 1963 to 1989), a mid-90s TV movie, and the current version of the show (which started in 2005) are all part of the same continuity – one long storyline, if you will. The new version isn’t a remake or reboot of the original; it’s a continuation.

Anyway, “Dr. Who and the Daleks” is not an episode of the TV show. It’s one of two movies from the 1960s which attempted to launch a theatrical movie franchise. Both movies were adapted from stories that had already been done on the British TV show, but they made changes to the show’s basic premise and so the two movies are NOT considered part of that continuity I just spoke of. In the movies, “Dr. Who” is not an alien, he’s a human who just happens to be a brilliant inventor, the creator of a time machine (the TARDIS).

The Daleks, by the way, are the Doctor’s most-famous adversaries. They are like evil versions of R2D2 – not robots, actually, but cyborgs: living brains, bent on galactic dominance, in robotic, salt-shaker-shaped bodies.

The movies don’t hold up to the TV show, but fans may want to see them just out of curiosity. Peter Cushing stars as “Dr. Who.” The second movie, “Daleks: Invasion Earth 2150 A.D.”, features a very young Bernard Cribbins, who would turn up decades later as one of the most-beloved guest characters on the new version of “Doctor Who,” Donna Noble’s grandfather Wilf. I have seen “Daleks: Invasion Earth 2150 A.D.,” but I have never seen “Dr. Who and the Daleks,” so I have set to tape it next week on TCM. I don’t expect it to be very good, based on what I’ve read, but it could be fun just as a novelty.

goodbye, goodbye

I flipped over to IFC to watch “Comedy Bang! Bang!”, one of my favorites, and the movie “Fast Times At Ridgemont High” was ending. There’s a song, played at the end of the movie and during the credits, called “Goodbye, Goodbye,” by Oingo Boingo.

The catchy chorus made be flash back to 1993. On what would be the very last night of “Late Night with David Letterman,” NBC aired a promo for the show which featured that chorus – “Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye” – over slow-motion footage of Dave standing up from behind his talk show desk and walking away. I don’t think it was anything staged; I think they just got a clip from some previous episode, slowed it down, and added the music. It was minimalist – but strangely appropriate. I was surprised the network was doing promos at all, because of the awkward and highly-publicized situation that led to Letterman’s exit, and the fact that he was already preparing to set up shop elsewhere.

CBS, of course, is still on good terms with Letterman, and they know that his last shows – which have been great – are a ratings windfall. So they’ve been promoting them heavily. I saw one promo last night, referencing the very last show this coming Wednesday, which included just a little snippet of “Viva La Vida” – the Coldplay song with the lyrics about “when I ruled the world.” They didn’t actually have the lyrics in the promo – just the catchy string intro. But it still evoked a sort of nostalgia. One of those SNL decade-by-decade documentaries ended with that same song, used to that same effect.

Dave is scheduled to have Tom Hanks on Monday, and Bill Murray (who was the first guest on both “Late Night” and “Late Show”) on Tuesday. Like Johnny Carson, he has no announced guests for his final night, so we’ll see what happens then. The rumor is that there’s going to be some sort of all-star Top Ten list, with ten huge stars delivering the entries, but I don’t know which night that might happen. Surely Regis will show up at some point. Dave has pooh-poohed the idea of Leno making an appearance. Dave, in at least one interview, said Leno invited Dave to appear on one of his last shows, but Letterman declined, saying the focus should be on Leno. Dave then said Leno had been invited, but may feel the same way about stealing focus from Letterman. Still, I wouldn’t rule it out entirely. They were able to keep that Super Bowl promo a total secret a few years back, so perhaps they have some similar surprise here. (Maybe Wednesday’s show will end with them waking up in bed together, “Newhart” style.)

Oprah is on tonight, by the way.

making god smile

I used to have a CD called Making God Smile: An Artists’ Tribute to the Songs of Beach Boy Brian Wilson, which I adored – maybe a little too much. I loved it so much I wanted to share it, loaned it to an out-of-town friend, and never got it back. To make matters worse, I had (for some reason) only ripped a few favorite tracks to my computer, not the whole thing. And I don’t think those few tracks survived from that computer to the one I own now.

Well, when I was using an Amazon gift card for my birthday the other night, I looked for items on my wish list, and it was only $6.95, so I figured this was as good a time as any to replace it. My new copy arrived today.

This is a hard CD to explain, but I just love it. As the title indicates, it’s a tribute album, with various covers of Brian Wilson songs. Most of those tributes are by people who (if I’ve heard of them at all) are known as Christian artists – including two of my all-time favorites, Terry Scott Taylor and Randy Stonehill. Terry’s work in Daniel Amos and The Swirling Eddies has always been heavily influenced by both Brian Wilson and The Beatles, so it’s no surprise that he’d be a part of this. The album also includes Phil Keaggy and Sixpence None The Richer.

But this isn’t a Christian album per se. There is some spirituality to it, to the extent that some of Brian’s songwriting tends towards that, but not the over, ham-handed spirituality found in most quote-Christian-unquote music. And there are plenty of other cuts that are just fun Beach Boys stuff.

The covers are fun – some hew close to the originals, others veer off. Kevin Max, formerly of DC Talk, and Jimmy Abegg, who played in Vector and for Rich Mullins, and now is a member of Steve Taylor & The Perfect Foil, the band I saw last November and won’t shut up about, offer a delightfully-weird, slowed-down version of “Help Me Rhonda,” giving it an almost morbid quality.

I think my favorite cut, though, is the very first one. Tom Prasada-Rao and Amilia K. Spicer’s duet on “Your Imagination” is just beautiful, bright and melodic, with wonderful harmony. I bet it made Brian Wilson smile. Which leads me to the question you always have with a collection like this – what did the honoree think of it? Had Brian heard of any of these people before? (I’m sure he’s heard of Sixpence, and perhaps he even remembered Phil Keaggy from his days in Glass Harp.) Did he enjoy what they did with his music? I would love to know.

Obviously, he’s not opposed to tributes to his work, such as that all-star BBC video from last year.

All of this, of course, is getting me primed for the Brian Wilson biopic coming out this summer:

wow, I could have had (something other than) a v-8

When I hear “Mott’s,” I think apple juice.

motts_products_vegetable_juice_spicyBut Mott’s has introduced a vegetable juice (re-introduced? It seems to have been introduced, then went away for a while according to some web sites, and now is back in a different-shaped bottle).

Most store brand vegetable juices try to copy V-8 as closely as possible, but the Mott product is deliberately different from V-8. It’s not as thick and the vegetable blend is different – zestier, with flavors like green pepper, garlic and dill that you might associate with salsa or salads. Like V-8, it comes in regular, spicy-hot and low sodium versions. (The regular versions contain almost as much sodium as V-8, which is to say a lot.)  I’m trying the spicy version, after seeing it at the store. The spicy is what I would usually get if buying V-8. I like it. I really like the flavor of it better than V-8.

The Mott’s product, probably because of the different vegetables, is not as much of a vitamin powerhouse as V-8, but it does have 100 percent of your daily requirement of Vitamin C and 25 percent of Vitamin A, plus some iron and potassium. But if you don’t like V-8, you might like this, and it would be better for you than something sugary. It tastes a little closer to bloody mary mix (which I sometimes buy and just drink by itself, sans booze), so those of you who make bloody marys might want to try it as well.

whirlwind

It has been a heck of a week so far, and it’s only Wednesday.

Last night, of course, was the annual Nashville Symphony concert at Calsonic Arena in Shelbyville, for which I’m a co-chair. Of course, I probably shouldn’t take credit for that this year; I’ve been spending my days in Lewisburg for the past month, and that meant that Dawn Holley had to do most of the heavy lifting. This was, without going into it, a really difficult year for the concert. We didn’t think it was going to happen at all, and then when we found out we had gotten a reprieve, we were already late hitting the ground. But I have spent more than 20 years now working to promote this concert, and as frustrated as Dawn and I became with the process this year, all was forgiven the moment that Vinay Parameswaran picked up his baton Tuesday night. I love this event. Check out the photos here.

This morning, I went in to the Times-Gazette – remember the Times-Gazette? – in my role as certified master tour guide. Most of the tours I give are for small collections of scouts. But this morning, we had two large groups of kindergarten students from Cascade. We gave the tour to the first group (two classrooms, or about three dozen kids), then they traded places with another group which had been down at the fire station.

We’d been worried about how things would go with two such large groups, but it all worked out fine. I did my normal routine as tour guide, but I can’t take credit for a couple of special additions to the program. With each group, we took a group photo before they started the tour, and then a few photos during the course of the tour. Our paginators put together a mock front page of the newspaper featuring each group, and we printed out copies on our color copier, so each child got to take home a mock front page featuring his or her tour group. (The teachers held on to the front pages until, I suspect, the end of the day.) 

Our first group had finished its tour and was waiting in our front lobby for the other group to return on the school bus from the fire station and switch places. Our publisher, on the spur of the moment, brought out an end roll of newsprint and unrolled it on the floor from one end of the room to the other. We scrounged for every Sharpie or highlighter in the building and just let the kids draw on the giant strip of newsprint. It was so popular that we let the second group do the same thing, even though we didn’t need to kill the same amount of time.

roll of paper

Just as soon as the tour was over, I was out the door and on the way from my permanent employer to my temporary employer, the Marshall County Tribune, where I’ve been spending my days lo this past month. In Marshall County, I had to put together a Lewisburg election results story and then cover a meeting at Henry Horton State Park involving our U.S. congressman. In between, of course, there was other routine stuff – formatting school lunch menus, typing up marriage license listings and real estate transfers, that sort of thing.

I rushed back from Lewisburg to Shelbyville in time for normal Wednesday night dinner at First United Methodist. My lunch had consisted of a bag of potato chips, so I eagerly tore into Andy Borders’ meal of ham, pinto beans, turnip greens and hoe cakes.

So it’s been a hectic 24 hours, and the rest of the week will be busy too. Tomorrow night, even though I am not a cancer survivor, I will attend the annual Relay For Life Cancer Survivor Dinner here in Shelbyville. I, in my role as a Relay organizing committee member, will give a brief “Why I Relay” testimony among several other speakers. Relay is less than a month away, and you can give towards my participation by clicking here.

On Friday night, my father and Ms. Rachel will take me out to dinner to celebrate the relentless passage of time. (I will turn 53 on Friday.)